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Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust rated as Outstanding

It's following an official inspection.

England's Chief Inspector of Hospitals has rated Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust as Outstanding overall, following an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).   

CQC carried out its latest inspection in May 2019 and found the trust had made a number of improvements since it was inspected in 2016, when it was rated Good.  

As a result, the trust is now rated Outstanding overall. 

Further to its overall rating, the trust is rated Outstanding for being caring and well-led. 

It is rated Good for being safe, effective and responsive. 

CQC’s Chief Inspector of Hospitals, Professor Ted Baker, said: “We were impressed by the high-quality care and treatment offered by Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust.

“Staff were caring, compassionate and dedicated to their roles. They treated patients with kindness, dignity and respect – particularly when patients felt distressed or were experiencing emotional difficulties. 

“Leaders engaged thoroughly with patients and staff. They used feedback to shape the future of the trust, and they proactively learned from things that had gone wrong. Managers communicated effectively and set the right priorities, helping to build a positive culture and sense of common purpose. Without exception, staff spoke very highly of the organisation as an employer. All this had a positive impact on patient care.

“The trust’s community sexual health services respected people’s privacy while supporting their individual needs. This service worked particularly successfully to support vulnerable people, including those who had been sexually assaulted or abused. Staff were resourced with the right training and information, and they worked collaboratively with other services to get the best possible outcomes for people.

“An Outstanding rating is the result of a tremendous amount of hard work and commitment; I congratulate everyone involved. We continue to monitor the trust and we will return to carry out further inspections to check on progress with improvements.”

Inspectors witnessed several areas of outstanding practice across the trust, including:

• Staff empowed patients to make decisions about their care
• Initiatives improved outcomes for people receiving wound care in the community
• A reverse-mentoring initiative, which paired leaders with junior staff who identified with protected characteristics, gave insight into working life at the trust and challenged any unconscious bias
• Effective working with other healthcare providers promoted early identification of sepsis
• Support from leaders fostered a positive working environment, particularly around ensuring staff were not pressured to work outside their contracted hours. 

 

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